Maya Cummings To Join Crowded Race For Late Husband’s Seat

Maya Rockeymoore Cummings announced Monday that she would run for her late husband’s congressional seat after abdicating her chairmanship of the Maryland Democratic Party.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://talkingpointsmemo.com/?p=1261468

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Saw her on Rachel Maddow last night.

She seems definitely up to the tasks of campaigning and governing.

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Double mastectomy, yikes! Think you might be more laser focused on your recovery.

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She may end up joining the ranks of other wives who took the seats of their deceased husbands. This could be a good thing for the people of Baltimore who may be looking to screw Trump over after his continued insults to the late Elijah and their fair city.

Would be wonderful.

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Keep the Cummings legacy alive.

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It’s prophylactic surgery. So it’s an easier recovery than it would be if she had breast cancer.

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Counterpoint: Dynasties are bad.

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Only if they have John Forsythe and Joan Collins in starring roles.

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Still major surgery. But you’re right; it does beat surgery + chemo/radiation.

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So Maya Rockeymoore is well known inside Washington policy circles (in her areas of expertise). She’s a smart, serious and formidable policy advocate and the idea that she is only qualified to run because she is the wife of the deceased incumbent is way out of line. She’s an accomplished person and a totally credible candidate. That said, of course she will have a huge advantage running as his widow. Her recognition in that Baltimore district (as opposed to one from the DC suburbs) is solely due to her association with Cummings. I don;t see that as a bad thing.

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She has her own excellent credentials in policy and politics. Being his widow gives her a huge political boost, but she is very well qualified for the job.

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Nevertheless, political dynasties are bad for democracy.

Blame it on assortative mating then.

If she had no qualification other than being the spouse, I’d totally agree. If she never married Cummings, she still be an excellent candidate (with a different kind of agenda than Rep Cummings), though I doubt she’d be running in Baltimore.

I also think you underestimate how much local political offices are very often wired for the person next-in-line even when they have no familial bonds. I find organizational dynasties more objectionable because the ties are not transparent.

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Hereditary monarchies occasionally produce good regents. They are still bad.

Your analogy continues to demean her talent and abilities that she honed entirely independent of her late husband. And she still has to win the election, and I think voters are smart enough to discern whether she is fit for the job. If the district doesn’t want her, they won’t vote for her. She’s not being appointed.

Maryland once elected a total ass-hole republican governor because we really didn’t think her royal highness Kathleen Kennedy Townsend was up for the job. Then again Congressman Ben Cardin and John Sarbanes is the 2nd generation of a prominent powerful MD pol.

I demean nothing about her talents, abilities, or accomplishments. Nevertheless, political dynasties remain bad and corrosive to our democracy.

Come on, this “hereditary” stuff is ridiculous. This woman was E Cummings wife, but also political partner and knows exactly what he did and accomplished. This is the reason wives are often the ones to take the seat of their deceased husbands–they were in the know, and why should we waste insight and intellect for no reason other than some PC idea…?

The Prince of Wales was His Majesty’s son, but also his political confidante who was raised from childhood to rule justly and wisely. That is the reason the Crown passes via primogeniture.

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Right, and you think someone who has been a faithful and intimate companion of a congressperson can’t have the same wisdom and love of justice???