Discussion: Zinke Says ‘Konnichiwa’ To Japanese-American Senator

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Smackdown!

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ディックヘッド
Dikkuheddo

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And I bet he’d been practicing that for awhile.

Ass reasserts his asshood confirming he’s still an ass.
Senator Hanabusa shows exceptional class in making classic put-down.

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I do not speak Japanese. But in the Spanish variants spoken everywhere in the world, there is a universal name for people like Zinke (AND Donald Trump): fucking pendejo.

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Could have been worse- he might have said 'arigato, Mr. Roboto.

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Every non-WASP person without exception knows how it feels when someone singles you out and tries to let you know they’re somehow down with you, sensitive, all that. It’s like to them you’re walking around with a big neon sign on your head advertising your DIFFERENCE. And they’re trying to let you know it’s OK with them that you’re you. My advice, which I never give: Don’t. Fucking. Do. That. Just be cool. Because doing that never, ever means to them what you think it does.

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I suppose we should be grateful he didn’t pull on the sides of his eyes and stick his front teeth out when he said it.

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Perfect.

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It was a classic comeback and Zinke deserved it.

I think to the joy of many of you I am going to stop reading TPM for a while. I need to find a site that really covers stories including context and doesn’t always go for the lowest common denominator snark.

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How white of him …

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Zinke paused and then suggested he would fund the program

There was a hint of a smile on Hanabusa’s face. Sayonara, she said, under her breath.

For Sayonara, literally translated, ‘Since it must be so,’ of all the good-bys I have heard is the most beautiful.

Unlike the Auf Wiedershens and Au revoirs, it does not try to cheat itself by any bravado ‘Till we meet again,’ any sedative to postpone the pain of separation. It does not evade the issue like the sturdy blinking Farewell. Farewell is a father’s good-by. It is - ‘Go out in the world and do well, my son.’ It is encouragement and admonition. It is hope and faith. But it passes over the significance of the moment; of parting it says nothing. It hides its emotion. It says too little. While Good-by (‘God be with you’) and Adios say too much. They try to bridge the distance, almost to deny it. Good-by is a prayer, a ringing cry. ‘You must not go - I cannot bear to have you go! But you shall not go alone, unwatched. God will be with you. God’s hand will over you’ and even - underneath, hidden, but it is there, incorrigible - ‘I will be with you; I will watch you - always.’ It is a mother’s good-by.

But Sayonara says neither too much nor too little. It is a simple acceptance of fact. All understanding of life lies in its limits. All emotion, smoldering, is banked up behind it. But it says nothing. It is really the unspoken good-by, the pressure of a hand, ‘Sayonara.’

— Anne Morrow Lindbergh

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How charming.

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I’m sure he was tempted.

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Myself not included.

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Clip I have used in new hire diversity training.

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That’s so beautiful. How did a woman of such eloquence stay married to a sick, philandering bastard like Charles Lindbergh?

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That’s pretty funny.

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