Discussion: White Supremacist References Plaster NZ Mosque Killer's Rifles, Online Posts

Note how the shooters were influenced by the worst of America. The likes of a Dylan Roof and a Trump.
The Nazis took a cue from the Confederacy, Antebellum South and early 1900’s eugenics. This is why we need to do better selling ourselves on the diplomatic front.

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We ignore the threat in our midst at our peril.

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Ummmmm… The second half of the sentence sums up the whole motivation…

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I teach at a university and there there’s always a very small minority of my students who clearly spend a lot of time in these ‘dark corners.’ I know when they drop references in the seminar, a lot of them referenced in this article. I have three of them in my seminar this term. One seems like a follower, one seems like he’s motivated more by being a rebel, but the third one simply seems angry and hateful, just radiating rage. Our university administration has forced us to be trained to spot ‘extremism,’ which is clearly motivated by spotting Islamic extremism. I oppose the policy. But today I am contemplating reporting that third student.

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The first paragraph of this article badly needs a rewrite.

A couple of small points: The Ustachi were pro-Nazi Croat militiamen.

The Battle of Tours was 732, not 734.

Meaningless? Very likely.

FYI - The song “Fire” was written by Greg Lake of the band King Crimson way back in the 1968.

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The only thing the song “Fire” by English rock band “The Crazy World of Arthur Brown” had in common with ELP was the drummer Carl Palmer.
Greg Lake was in King Crimson before ELP.
Ah my high school prog rock past comes back to me.

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ELP was well known as using the old Greg Lake/King Crimson song “Fire” as a “warm-up” tune during rehearsal while on concert tour.
They included a recording of it on their “Return of the Manticor” compilation album in 1993.

ELP - Fire

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I didn’t know that they kept playing it at concerts. Probably because of Palmers influence.
Dave Weigel the political analyst at the Washington Post has an excellent book out on the history of progressive rock.

Under Trump’s tutelage, 350 years of America’s racist heritage is now spreading like wildfire, all over the world :earth_americas: :earth_asia: :earth_africa:

Is it any wonder that these sub-humans are always captured alive?

…If this was a black man, he would have been shot full of lead bullets :black_circle: :black_circle: :black_circle:

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(https://www.newsweek.com/new-zealand-mosque-shooting-manifesto-trump-1364488)
The gunman who allegedly killed at least 49 people in two Mosques in New Zealand early Friday morning appeared to have produced a 73-page manifesto in which President Donald Trump was described as “a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose.”

There are dozens of points like that, I suspect.

But, no, I don’t think they are meaningless. They illustrate this entire idiotic movement very well.

Feliks Kazimierz Potocki illustrates it best, I think.

Why is he mentioned? It’s a mind-boggling choice. Not that I want to have an opinion, or defend anything or anyone, but this just takes one aback. Why is he here? He doesn’t fit.

Took me a while to figure it out. He means Stanislaw Potocki. Not Feliks Kazimierz Potocki.

We are told - he put Feliks name in because of the Polish expedition in defense of Vienna in 1683 (some say the biggest Polish political mistake in history… but I digress). Problem. Feliks (47 years old at the time) didn’t fight in it… His troops were under the command of Col. Skarbek. Feliks took part in the expedition, but he was too ill by the time of battle.

And yes, Feliks did fight elsewhere also against people of Muslim faith but he was not some brilliant military commander, or a crusader. Energetic, yes. But nothing beyond that. He was also a mediocre politician. There is not much in terms of ideology or ideals in Feliks that we know of. Yet another aristocrat.

Stanislaw Potocki was also a Husar, also commanding his own flag (well, his father’s, this expedition was his father’s thing…) he was 24 at the time, and he DIED while fighting in that battle. Some say he died heroically. His heart is still buried in one of the Vienna’s cathedrals. The funeral after the battle was said to be equal to that of some Greek hero. Multiple kings participated. Oh and his body, buried in today’s Ukraine was kicked out from the cathedral there under the Soviet rule (1963 or some such…)

The murderous morons can’t even point to their imagined heroes right.

I always thought that the European forces at Vienna were led by Jan Sobieski. I know very little about it. I know a little about the siege of Vienna in 1529, which the military historian Fletcher Pratt designated as one of the most important battles in history for two reasons: First, it was the crest of Turkish (not specifically Muslim) expansion into Europe (Pratt wrote from a very Euro-American view) and second that many of the landschnechts who fought for the defenders were German Lutherans, and by the time the siege was over the Reformation was too far along to be undone. Pratt described the 1683 siege as more a matter of local politics.