Discussion: Treasury Misses Ways And Means's Final Deadline To Produce Trump Taxes

Since the law is so clear, do they need to deal with a subpoena or can they go straight to contempt?

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Next obstruction item for the impeachment agenda.

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I imagine later today John Koskinen, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, and Steven Mnuchin, Sec. of Treasury, will be eating dinner in their homes or in fine restaurants despite flagrantly breaking the law by defying Congress’ demand for Trump’s tax returns.

Meanwhile, Chelsea Manning will remain in prison indefinitely for refusing to testify in front of a Grand Jury investigating Wikileaks.

Such is American Justice.

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IANAL obviously, so why a need for a subpoena. They broke the law, did not deliver, so can’t they request an AUSA or someone move to indict?

Panda Barr couldn’t be expected to do shit about it, since he’s the president’s Roy Cohn.

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Shocking.

Fuck this, time to break out the Tiki Torches for a GOOD purpose this time.

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You can’t really indict someone for not acceding to demands made in a letter, no matter how sternly worded.

As the response was always predictable, Rep. Neal should have saved a useless step and begun with the subpoena. No one is going to give him any credit – not one iota – for his forbearance.

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I’m not even sure they have to go the contempt route.

The law in question says that the returns “shall” be provided, No conditions, no exceptions. IANAL but, the failure of the administration to follow the law should be sufficient to justify a request for an injuction demanding the returns.

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What? Don’t they know their reputations are at stake? Maybe someone should play golf with them and work everything out. Otherwise, things are just going to get even more awkward at all the best dinner parties and that’s the real tragedy. What about the norms?!

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Not to mention there are detailed criminal penalties for not obeying the tax code as an employee of the IRS.

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Neal first requested the returns on April 3 in a letter tailored to prevail in the case of an expected legal challenge.

It took Rep. Neal 3 months to write the 2-page letter requesting the tax returns.

3 months to write a 2-page letter.

He’ll probably write another Sternly Written Letter in about 2 weeks, followed by a subpoena authorization vote 2-weeks after that.

Then maybe an actual subpoena 2 weeks after that requesting the returns in 2 weeks.

Another Pelosi slow-walker.

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not sure about an indictment, but injunctive relief should be available without a subpoena being issued, insofar as the law is clear and unambiguous.

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This I agree with.

The ambiguous part is the required “legitimate legislative purpose.”

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Meh, put the jury out on this one. It’s helping to set the paper-trail pattern of non-cooperation by the administration, an important paper trail as these subpoenas start going to court. Giving the good-faith friendly effort first before resorting to a subpoena is going to play much better before the judges.

(until it reaches the Supreme Court, and they rule 5-4…)

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Yep. That’s all he did in three months, because we’re now allowed to invent our own realities. I myself sent dragons to both Neal and Pelosi and neither of them even TRIED to use them against Trump.

It’s like Democrats are trying to follow the rules and do things properly instead of acting like Republicans and screwing everything up. What’s the matter with them? Don’t they know actions are easier than words?

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Shit, you fed him.

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No, Pelosi and her slow-walkers will have to investigate for the next 18 months whether or not the tax returns were delivered on time.

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No, the criticism of Neal is not so easily dismissed. The letter he sent should not have taken more than a few hours to prepare. Give a week for review and one more night to sleep on it. You’re still not at 3 months.

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The executive branch is essentially an “appendage of Trump.”

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