Discussion: Total Solar Eclipse Sweeps Ashore In Oregon In Rare March Across US

How eclipse really happens

And picture of recent totaled eclipse

Funny to hear guys at work that are gung ho republican Trump lovers talk about NASA doing a lot of studies on the eclipse, when they probably hate that NASA believes in global warming. And now they are talking about NASA accidentally selling moon dust. I’m surprised they really believe people landed on the moon too.

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Trump supporters are staying up late tonight because they heard that the story about the eclipse during the day today is fake news and the real eclipse won’t be until just after midnight tonight.

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It was the coolest thing ever!

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From my front porch. Happy star gazing everyone.

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Cool!!

I am pretty far from a starry-eyed dirt worshipper, but having just experienced it, I would encourage anyone to go pretty far out of your way to see a total eclipse of the sun. It cannot be properly described or prepared for, because it is like nothing else. Before totality was cool, during it was transcendence.

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It rained all morning, and is raining now, but for a couple of glorious hours around noon we enjoyed sunshine. We watched the eclipse from my mother-in-laws back porch just a few miles south of I-70 east of Kansas City. We had totality for a little over a minute. It was amazing. My mother-in-law smiled as she said that was the first total eclipse she had seen in her 96 years. We were all smiles.

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I was fortunate enough to get sent to St. Louis for my new project. Project site is just outside the line of totality, but we got mighty dark here - call it a late dusk. The cicadas in our landscaping went berserk, the parking lot lights came on and it was a most enjoyable experience.

First photo is of the profile of the sun through the trees as it neared totality. Second picture is the parking lot - this was at 1:15pm CDT.

ETA: sadly, TPM photo uploads are still wonky after the weekend.

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For us astronomers, there isn’t much science in eclipses anymore…while the 1918 one was critical to show the relativity was an improvement over Newtonian physics, nowadays we usually don’t do too much. There will be some studies of the corona and chromosphere, as the Moon cuts much closer to the edge than our coronagraphs, and I heard someone will do some star measurements for relativity testing. It would be a different story if the eclipse passed over an observatory, but we can’t control that.

The big deal about this one is the public relations aspect. Millions of people will see a total eclipse, most for the first time, and it’s really an amazing show. Getting people to look up and see that will hopefully drive them to look into more science stuff, and that will draw them away from the darkness of bad science out there. It’s probably even more important that it cuts across the heartland of the US, that part of the nation really needs the science education as they have received so much anti-science propaganda from Republicans and other conservatives. If the kids there start learning about science, then the middle of the US will stop being a drag against things like climate change discussions.

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I can only hope you are correct.

However, parents who had asked for school eclipse events to be re-scheduled because of conflicts at home probably need just as much education as the kids. And I was shocked to find, with the people I watched with in St. Louis at a pretty scientific-based company (a pharma company) how little many of the younger ones knew with respect to eclipses and how they happen and why we shouldn’t look at the sun during one, as was memorably demonstrated by our very own POTUS.

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This is at Jay Em in SE Wyoming. About 2.5 minutes of totality. Flat out amazing. I was considerably more impressed than I expected to be.

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Living in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana, I beat a path to an area near Mt Borah in Idaho near the centerline. No large crowds, traffic acceptable and everyone just excited to be there. I just wish now I had taken two cameras.
There seemed to be such an unusual quality to the darkness.

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Through the colander, R’amen

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I teach in a high school. Teachers were issued 3 sets of eclipse glasses each and a stack of note cards with a hole punched in them. We talked to our students about the importance of not looking at the sun. I have to say that it was an amazing experience. We passed the glasses around. We passed out note cards. Our jaded teenagers were totally transfixed. Language barriers went away–we handed cards or glasses to our English language learners and shared their excitement as they talked to their friends. Every student that I saw was impressed and excited–and not one looked at the sun without eye protection.
We went out right after lunch, so I can’t say that none of them looked at the sun before they came in from lunch, but for the most part, it was a memorable and positive day–for all of us.

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Wish I’d thought about the colander. I made a camera obscura, but here in Taos, it was the light. The light was amazing and difficult to describe. But it was kind of like being inside a Taos sunset.

We were lucky that it was completely clear until right after it ended and the clouds bounced up out of the south like they do and covered the sky.

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Where is your porch?

One of the NASA guys mentioned colanders a few days ago. I thought I was unique, but EVERYBODY on the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster facebook was doing it. Resulted in some beautiful dot patters!

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I posted similar images of leaf patterns in Seattle. You really did capture the quality of light we also saw here. Its light unlike a sunset or sunrise, which is much more diffuse – this light made the colors deeper and detail was crisp – like closing the aperture on a camera brings things into clearer focus. This was an astonishing other worldly experience even though we didn’t have the good fortune to witness the totality.

As far as picture uploads, if you have a Mac, hold down the control button and click the image. You will see an option to select copy address. Click on that and then paste to TPM comment box.

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