Discussion: Obama And Putin Have Totally Awkward D-Day Encounter

Discussion for article #223601

I just read the transcript of Obama’s speech at Omaha Beach. It was an incredibly moving tribute to all our servicemen.

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On CNN.com home page:

Obama talked informally with Putin on sidelines of D-Day commemorations luncheon in France, White House says.

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I love the body language of this photo. Putin off to the side, isolated, as he should be. Actually, he shouldn’t even be there.

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He seems a bit isolated.

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Looks like a KGB agent ! Drab, Cold, Detached

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Great optics…Angry little Putina, pouting that he’s not the center of attention.

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“He seems a bit isolated.”

I don’t know, looks secure and confident standing by himself.

Obama (sigh), always the gentleman.

Mornin’ DJ

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Obama, empathetic. Putin, narcissistic.

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Wow is this writer dizzy from the spin in this story ?

Indeed it was and I saw part of it this morning and he can deliver a speech like no one else. His grandfather as you know was a WWII vet so I am sure it had special meaning. They were so young and they must have been scared to death.

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What spin are you referring to

I like the “always a gentleman”

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The Soviet Union lost more than 20 - 40 million civilians and military personnel in WWII; 9-14 million soldiers, sailors and airmen. The figures can only be given as ranges owing to disputes among historians and sources of information. Given this, I’d say that it’s perfectly fine for Russia to have a representative here even if Putin is not the best one they could send.

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Saying it was " Awkward "…our President doe not do " Awkward "

also this.

At one point as the crowd moseyed slowly toward the building, Obama was right behind Putin and could have tapped him on the shoulder if he wanted to but instead focused his attention elsewhere as if not noticing who was there.


Sounds like the writer;s opinions to me.

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The outcome might well have been different without them. So their leader deserved to be there, and on the other hand Putin deserved to be isolated. Life is complicated, that’s for sure.

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"I like the “always a gentleman”

Truth is, he gets a lot of mileage out of it and considering all the spoiled brats crying and running around at his feet he does look like the only adult in Washington.

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A picture is worth a thousand words…the photo accompanying this story says it all. Obama’s attention to the Queen is so genuine, using both hands to help the Queen. He is such s gentleman, so attentive to her. Great shot of our President. What a great man.

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Agreed. Russia absorbed the bulk of the body blows and ground the German forces down.

My Dad, 89, is WWII vet, 100th Infantry, southern France/Vosges/Germany…

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There’s no question that the USSR did the vast majority of the dying and most of the Nazi-killing in the ETO. And Russians are typically aggrieved by what they perceive to be a lack of appreciation of the centrality of their role in defeating Nazi Germany in the west. But at the same time, they themselves don’t seem to be very aware of the extent to which their gigantic casualty rates were the direct result of the fact that Stalin was a monstrous, mass-murdering sociopath to whom human life, quite literally, meant less than nothing.

Somehow, that reality got buried under the USSR and has yet to reappear to sully the mythology of the Great Patriotic War constructed during the Cold War. the use of tactics that amounted to smothering the Germans under the weight of Soviet corpses. The deliberate feeding of troops perceived as potentially politically unreliable based on whatever paranoid psychotic thought was dancing around in Stalin and Beria’s heads at a given time into impregnable German positions. The imprisonment of Soviet soldiers who escaped after being captured and returned to their units as “spies and saboteurs.” Decisions about which cities or units to relieve based on their perceived political reliability.

Certainly, we have our own myths about that war that we’ve been loathe to subject to close scrutiny. The horror and atrocity of the aerial bombardment campaigns, for example, is a thing with which we have only imperfectly come to grips. But the Russian tendency to lay all of the Soviet dead at the feet of Hitler, without giving Stalin his share of the credit, tends to dampen my sympathy for Russian grievance over the lack of recognition of their contribution.

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