Discussion: Cuba Elects 57-Year-Old Bureaucrat To Replace Raul Castro

Wow! Was this a bad cut-and-paste job, or is this verbatim what AP published? Because somebody needs an editor…

The 86-year-old Castro will remain head of the Communist Party, which is designated by the constitution as “the A 57-year-old bureaucrat will take Raul Castro’s place as the president of Cuba on Thursday as a government led by a single family for six decades tries to ensure the long-term survival of one of the world’s last communist states.

Members of the National Assembly opened the crucial session a day after voting on Miguel Mario Diaz-Canel Bermudez’s nomination as the sole candidate for president. The result was to be officially announced Thursday morning but the result was clear because the assembly approves all executive branch proposals by margins of 95 percent or higher.

superior guiding force of society and the state.” As a result, he will still be the most powerful person in Cuba for the time being.

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“an editor”

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Scandinavians vacation regularly in Cuba and e.g. Sweden’s development agency SIDA has been active in Cuba. Certainly, adopting a social democracy model would be good for Cuba and further ease US-Cuban tensions. It would also get Cuba out of the war business as in the Angola days, and put the country on the road to capital accumulation that could make it a rich country. After waiting over three decades, Cuba signed the Tlatelolco Treaty, putting it on par with Nordic countries in terms of nuke-free zones. That was a big step in this shift of economic and policy direction that doesn’t get adequate mention.

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Where is @Cervantes when we need him? Is it just me, or is the almost universal use of hyphenated last names for Spanish named people the world over a construct of post Feminists and of North Americans and Brits who refuse to recognize the Spanish language use of Paternal and Maternal last names? I was going to link the correct usage to a Spanish newspaper report, but La Vanguardia, Barcelona’s newspaper of record, has him as Diaz-Canel. I first noticed this trend in the captions and texts of United States law reports (as in US v Diaz-Canel, etc).

We need a deep dive into why the hyphenated last name is being imposed. Sorry to be a nerd but this is kind of annoying.

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Hopefully the Cuban people can now attain more prosperity. Viva 26Julio! Viva la revolution!

El mismo perro con diferente collar.

Hyphenated, or “double barreled” surnames are an affectation.

Signed,

Ralph Featherstonhaugh-Mainwaring (Pronounced Fanshaw-Mannering)

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I’d say there was a substantial proof-reading error here but i don’t think these things get proof-read.

I think Cuba is correct in taking a go-slow approach to societal change, especially with the examples of Russia and China so prominent. Liberty can quickly turn to kleptocracy, as Russia did, and now they have another strong-man.

Well, in Spanish double un-hyphenated last names are a tradition that is paternalistic or sexist in the ordering of a person’s paternal last name first, to be followed by the maternal one. I suspect the origin is also elitist, as it allowed folks to show that both sides of their lineage was a known rich family name. In some cases, the entire paternal-maternal name combination was perpetuated (rather than continuing to switch the maternal last name for each next generation) such as the setting in concrete of the Cuban last name Diaz Balart or the Puerto Rican last name Ramirez de Arellano. And, I will note that some of my feminist male Latino and non Latino friends have, upon marrying, taken on the wife’s last name, placing the wife’s last name first in the sequence of their future children’s two family last names.
Anyway, yes, an affectation. Agreed.

Well of course it is. I think we all knew that, amirite?

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That’s exactly what Cholomondley Myerscough-Ayscoug (Chumly Maskyoo-Askyoo) said.

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The story as it was meant to be read.

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Perhaps. But for centuries, the paternal and maternal last names were not hyphenated. Now they are hyphenated. Like I said, I first saw this usage in US legal opinions where every Spanish surname became hyphenated as some sort of belated adaptation of Anglo Feminist retention of the maiden name with a hyphen for the husband’s last name. So, whether it was meant to be read in English or Spanish, I think the hyphenation of the traditional Paternal & Maternal last name (which allowed one’s elders to spend entire Sunday afternoons tracing genealogies of the subjects of their oral history or sometimes just gossip) is a construct of Anglos. Sorry to be a nerd about this.

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You’re a wonderful nerd. We need more of this rather than (fill in the blank) sucks and should go fuck himself. BTW most of the major stories at NYT advise Leer en español, that says a lot about who we are as a country.

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Thanks.

I began boycotting the NYT when they bent the knee to Reagan and immediately flipped the entire tone of their coverage of Central America. I read Newsday for about three decades or until I became aware that the Dolans had acquired it …or until Murray Kempton died…they had good sports, good US and international news. Then I read Spanish newspapers for about 10 years on line. Now I read The Washington Post. But I read the NYT from junior high (in Puerto Rico, where my Dad bought it) and then in college and here, until Reagan came in. And they fired their Latin America editor and installed some Neocon. Anyway…

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The worthiness of the NYT vs WaPo is an ongoing discussion here. When I was a kid in NY, well, young adult, and I traveled by subway to work, I had the print edition of NYT in my hands. Now that I’m “vintage”, as a friend described it, I still have the print edition in my hands and digital WaPo. I don’t hold grudges about years ago reporting. I wouldn’t know half the stuff I know if I didn’t read it. I used to read Time and Newsweek regularly, now I’m down to the print editions of the New Yorker and the Atlantic.

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I am impressed. I used to read The Nation, North American Congress on Latin America Report on the Americas, Harper’s Magazine, and a Newspaper. When I was in my 30s I also received The Economist and forced myself to slog through it as well. In my 50s I began giving up some of the volume, and reading books on my subway commute. Yeah. I hold grudges when a paper with lots of influence becomes part of the cheerleading section for the crappy flim flam likes of Ronald Reagan, who I still think was almost as bad as Donald Trump.

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