Discussion: South Dakota Wants City Dwellers, Native Americans To Work For Medicaid

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connect those who can work with jobs that give them that sense of self-worth and accomplishment

Does this sentiment apply to the wealthy scions of the 1% who benefit mightily from a tax code designed around them?

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"And lo, Jesus said unto his brethren, ‘Feel not bad for the poor, for they have chosen their lot in life. Only the richest amongst you will be chosen to be at the side of Christ in Heaven.’ "

-The New-New Testament, King Trump Version.

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Republicans really don’t oppose government welfare.

Republicans are the biggest supporters of welfare programs… for themselves.

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but the Trump administration has asserted that exempting Native Americans would be granting an illegal racial preference

Yet Michigan, South Dakota and a few other states have looked to find ways to exempt rural, mainly White counties from the work rules. Wait, why am I falling into the trap? The GOP used the idea of county unemployment as a way to get around a direct attack on urban (mainly minority) areas. Yes, Michigan backed off, but I expect Republicans to try again to find a way to exempt their voters from this rule.

We saw this in North Carolina as McCrory was leaving office- the GOP passes voting reforms and the courts rule the GOP used race as a substitute for party allifiation. What Republicans are willing to do is punish anyone they don’t see as an ally. The idea of big tent Republicanism died an ugly death a while ago, and now the GOP is getting older, whiter and less tolerant of anything not them.

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Since the article didn’t cite the facts I would have liked to see, I looked them up–the two counties are 93% and 87% white. The state is 86% white. The situation is much different than Michigan. I am adamantly against the policy as a whole, but I think it may be hard to argue against on racial grounds.

I find it telling that that this is a tacit admission that there are not enough work training opportunities in rural areas and their solution is to not require rural people to work rather than fund work training in rural areas.

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Can anyone name any policies that the goopers have advanced that have helped the general population, much less the downtrodden, since Nixon initiated the EPA?

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The obvious solution is to build more McDonald’s in rural areas.

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GOP: These brown people need to go back to their country.

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Let’s all open our Webster’s Boys and Girls Moms and Dads

dis·crim·i·na·tion
dəˌskriməˈnāSH(ə)n/
noun
noun: discrimination; plural noun: discriminations

1.
the unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people or things, especially on the grounds of race, age, or sex.
"victims of racial discrimination"
synonyms:	prejudice, bias, bigotry, intolerance, narrow-mindedness, unfairness, inequity, favoritism, one-sidedness, partisanship; More
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Big part of being Nazi is not seeing the problem.

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“connect those who can work with jobs that give them that sense of self-worth and accomplishment.”

Now this is the very definition of social engineering which the right continually rails against.

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I love starting the morning with a challenge. Let’s see now … George Herbert Hoover Walker Bush worked with the Dems and signed a significant tax increase (albeit reluctantly) that decreased the (Reagan) deficit and helped set things up for the Clinton era of budget sanity (which Dubya then promptly “fixed”).

And, of course, he was reviled for it by his own party, and he didn’t get re-elected.

As for Bush the Lesser, his PEPFAR program is generally held to be a useful (though imperfect) contribution to the global fight against AIDS.

That, uh, might be about it.

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How “white” of South Dakota!

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Billie Sutton has a winning issue here for his candidacy, and he ought to pound this message to the voters of SD. I would hope that the fundamental unfairness of this would play well statewide and allow people to see this for what it is.

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Their program is welfare for the rich… to bad, so sad for the poor.

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Typical dastardly Republican villainy of course, but it is interesting to note that Trump actually WON the Native Americans vote nationalally. So…screw 'em, huh?

Votes have consequences. What a nice teachable moment for all.

“connect those who can work with jobs that give them that sense of self-worth and accomplishment.”

Now this is the very definition of social engineering which the right continually rails against.

===this is just an excuse, a heavy layer of lipstick on the pig

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Just to rub that fact in, from the other side of the pond:

The WelCond project, led by the University of York and involving the
Universities of Glasgow, Sheffield, Salford, Sheffield Hallam and
Heriot-Watt, analysed the effectiveness, impact and ethics of welfare
conditionality from 2013-2018.

The findings are based on repeat longitudinal interviews undertaken
with 339 people in England and Scotland and drawn from nine policy
areas, including Universal Credit, disabled people, migrants, lone
parents, offenders and homeless people.

Key findings include:

Little evidence welfare conditionality enhanced people’s motivation
to prepare for or enter paid work

Some people pushed into destitution, survival crime and ill health

Benefit sanctions routinely triggered profoundly negative personal,
financial and health outcomes

The mandatory training and support is often too generic, of poor
quality and largely ineffective in enabling people to enter and
sustain paid work

The report quotes a homeless man who says he was forced into drug
dealing due to welfare conditionality, while a disabled woman said she
“sunk into depression” as a result of benefit sanctions.

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But Jerilyn Church, the CEO of the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board (GPTCHB) in South Dakota, told state officials in a conference call in April that by not granting American Indians an exemption, they were pursuing a policy that was both harmful and illegal.

“Medicaid is an extension of the treaty obligation,” Church said, according to the meeting minutes. “Most American Indians want to work; but, on the reservation there is limited opportunity. … Data is clear that it is harder for American Indians to obtain jobs off the reservation compared to other populations.”

This part I find interesting. I’m reading as for American Indians on the reservation there aren’t enough jobs, and off the reservation they’re not hiring American Indians. So is this a move to depopulate the Reservations, and thus dilute their voting impact?

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